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I’ve now been working with the lab for three months, and my boss (who’s been working there for several years) has just noticed the big bottle of vodka in the kitchen refrigerator.

I was also recently told that many of the postdocs make regular visits to the shooting range. You know, to blow off steam after their experiments fail. Because, as they’ve told me, only roughly 0.5% of experiments will work.

Ah, science.

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caffeinated-biologist:

Spark, Spark! The Chemistry of Fireworks 
Ever wondered what causes those fancy fiery works of art shine so bright? The science of how fireworks operate is actually simple. And we’ll find out.Pyrotechnics, especially fireworks, operate on a simple theory called combustion. Combustion involves the use of oxygen, that why you can’t light a fire in an airtight setup. It also involves the release of energy, in form of heat and/or light energy.
For a firework to burst into an array of spectacular colors, it must contain the following:
Fuel. Must contain either charcoal or thermite alongside the common blackpowder.
Oxidizing Agents. These produces the oxygen needed to burn the mixture. These are either nitrates, chlorates, or perchlorates.
Reducing Agents. These react with the O2 released by the oxidizing agent/s to produce hot gases, and can also be used to control the speed of the reaction. Sulfur and charcoal are the most common reducing agents used.
Metals. These also control the speed of reaction. Larger surface area = faster reaction rate.
Coloring Agents. They give color to the firework. Strontium (Sr) produces red, Copper (Cu) produces blue, Barium (Ba) produces green, Sodium (Na) for yellow, Calcium (Ca) for orange, and Gold (Au) or Titanium (Ti) for an iron-ish color. These elements when heated, produces excess energy in form of light, and the higher the temperature, the shorter the wavelength.
Binders. These hold the mixture in a paste-like texture. The most commonly used binder is dextrin, though parson is also used.
So, fireworks are actually maelstroms of excess heat energy released by different reactions occurring inside the canister. So as we welcome 2014, let us appreciate these brilliant works of both art and science. Cheers to a new year!
-x
[Source: http://www.ch.ic.ac.uk/local/projects/gondhia/composition.html]

caffeinated-biologist:

Spark, Spark! The Chemistry of Fireworks 

Ever wondered what causes those fancy fiery works of art shine so bright? The science of how fireworks operate is actually simple. And we’ll find out.

Pyrotechnics, especially fireworks, operate on a simple theory called combustion. Combustion involves the use of oxygen, that why you can’t light a fire in an airtight setup. It also involves the release of energy, in form of heat and/or light energy.

For a firework to burst into an array of spectacular colors, it must contain the following:

  1. Fuel. Must contain either charcoal or thermite alongside the common blackpowder.
  2. Oxidizing Agents. These produces the oxygen needed to burn the mixture. These are either nitrates, chlorates, or perchlorates.
  3. Reducing Agents. These react with the O2 released by the oxidizing agent/s to produce hot gases, and can also be used to control the speed of the reaction. Sulfur and charcoal are the most common reducing agents used.
  4. Metals. These also control the speed of reaction. Larger surface area = faster reaction rate.
  5. Coloring Agents. They give color to the firework. Strontium (Sr) produces red, Copper (Cu) produces blue, Barium (Ba) produces green, Sodium (Na) for yellow, Calcium (Ca) for orange, and Gold (Au) or Titanium (Ti) for an iron-ish color. These elements when heated, produces excess energy in form of light, and the higher the temperature, the shorter the wavelength.
  6. Binders. These hold the mixture in a paste-like texture. The most commonly used binder is dextrin, though parson is also used.

So, fireworks are actually maelstroms of excess heat energy released by different reactions occurring inside the canister. So as we welcome 2014, let us appreciate these brilliant works of both art and science. Cheers to a new year!

-x

[Source: http://www.ch.ic.ac.uk/local/projects/gondhia/composition.html]

Source: caffeinated-biologist
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Merry Christmas

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mulled cider

Bailey’s

jager bombs

"no talking about science" rule

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I’ll be attending the lab’s holiday party at a postdoc’s apartment today, and the following thoughts have popped into my head:

  • Everyone’s bringing a significant other. That makes me, at the very least, the 18th wheel.
  • I’m the baby of the lab, and I don’t drink. How will that be received?
  • I bet this will be nothing like The Mindy Project.
  • Suddenly socialization feels like work. Oh, wait, it sort of is.
  • I wonder if this is going to feel like a really long lunch break.
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Exactly 50% of me wants to go to grad school/med school. I consider myself to be a pretty ambitious and competitive person.

The other 50% of me is worn out from my undergrad experience. Well, that and the amount of time and money spent on just applying is already overwhelming.

Oh, dear. We are in trouble.

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I wish I could work on Thanksgiving and Black Friday.

(At least I’d be making money instead of unwillingly participating in my family’s soap opera life.)

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Number of texts from my boss during that time: 12